Trying to grow your business from its humble roots and step into the major league was never easy. Today, when business landscape has become global playing field, we can easily say that it is even harder than before. So, what means do you have in fighting this amassed competition, which is becoming increasingly difficult to deal with? Aside from bare quality of product or service you are providing, marketing should be your strongest asset, because no matter how good you are at what you do, if there is no one to hear, you will soon fall off the radar. Here are three wallet-friendly marketing tactics which will prevent this unpleasant event from happening.

Use Your Website to its Full Potential

Your company’s website doesn’t have to be just a glorified brochure; it can be so much more if you are capable to generate traffic and turn visitors into leads, at least. In order to do this, you will need to put some quality content out there, because content is the single most important thing that will drive audience to your website after their initial visit. It can be anything interesting and useful: blogs, manuals, how-tos, top 10 lists or any other thing that draws attention and has something to do with your branch. Such posts need to be updated, because once visitor tries everything he will search for more and that can easily lead him to your competition. Once you have enough quality content published, your website won’t be just a place where people get on-the-go information, but credible and respected reference point.

Image credits: www.arthurweill.fr

Image credits: www.arthurweill.fr

 

Be the Most Social Person in the Business

Telling someone that social networks can be very powerful marketing tools may seem somewhat shabby, but it is really impressive how some companies still fail to utilize all the advantages these platforms can offer. Let’s get this clear first – Everything we said about your personal website applies here too, but it would be a great mistake to use your profiles simply to share links to that very website. Social networks were made with something else in mind, so if you fail to acknowledge social aspect and whole culture of the people using them, you won’t get too much likes or followers. So, be sure to interact with people, ask them for opinion, organize contests and polls, publish fan-art and try to grab attention even of people who are not necessarily interested in your product or service.

Be a Good Neighbor

No matter how great your online presence may be, if it doesn’t translates in the real life scenario you will waste all the hard work and come off as a hypocrite. So, your offline efforts should go along the same way as online. Make your HQ gathering place for all the people interested in your field of work and have patience for them even when they are not spending money. Organize free seminars and presentations and distribute free samples through neighborhood. It may be more demanding process than online route, but it will also generate more certain leads. Charity work will show everyone that you are not interested only in profit and supporting sport club will turn you into local hero. Also, there is no need to let your mentioned HQ to remain just a bland building. Turn it into something that will draw attention, spark interest and eventually become recognizable landmark in the area. If you are afraid that it’s too gimmicky, don’t worry, even the larger players are not above doing that.

As we can see, all the things we mentioned above can be summed up in being Mr. Nice Guy and providing people help and interesting content for free, but that is exactly the point. Such actions will certainly generate very strong and very positive word-of-mouth, which is in the end the most effective and the most enduring self-sustainable marketing solution you can imagine. So let the people do the marketing for you.

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Posted by Howard Bell

Howard Bell has been writing about technology for quite some time now, especially if you count his diary entries where he laments the pressing programming issues hiding behind the painfully obvious lack of the long blocks in Tetris (also known as the ‘stupid game is cheating’ bug). He has since refined his approach, trying to take a slightly more impartial and a bit more informative voice, but still finds inspiration in the ways that different devices can annoy him to wit’s end.